Can I use this

Discussion in 'Questions on Kits, Decals, Tools and Pilots' started by LoyalNine, Oct 9, 2009.

  1. LoyalNine

    LoyalNine New Member

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    I have a C02 tank to run my airbrush. Have not ever used it much but I do have it. I also have a Porter Cable compressor and was wondering if I could use that instead. If so what else will I need to do so?

    This is my stuff:
    Porter Cable Oil Free Induction Side Stack Compressor
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Depends, is it 150 pis Maximum? Can it be adjusted as to how much psi it puts out? My dad has a compressor that is 125psi Maximum so I can change it. If not i think Testors offers a can that you can hook your brush up to that is propellant.

    I think 20-40 psi is best. I have been yet to actually spray paint with my brush but was fiddling around with it this weekend and the directions say 20 psi, but others tell me 30-40 can be used to.

    Again, other will have more info, just my thoughts.

    Good luck and hope it helps a bit!
     
  3. RAF Liberators

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    I might be wrong but i'd say NO!!!! don't use the CO2 unless you want to die. OK that may have been a bit dramatic but CO2 is Carbon Dioxide, you know the stuff that people die from breathing too much of. We are supposed to breathe out CO2 not breathe it in.
    I'd sugest not using the CO2 unless you are in a well ventilated room.
    Prolonged exposure to moderate concentrations can cause acidosis and adverse effects on calcium phosphorus metabolism resulting in increased calcium deposits in soft tissue. Carbon dioxide is toxic to the heart and causes diminished contractile force.
    Toxicity and its effects increase with the concentration of CO2, here given in volume percent of CO2 in the air:

    1%, as can occur in a crowded auditorium with poor ventilation, can cause drowsiness with prolonged exposure.
    At 2% it is mildly narcotic and causes increased blood pressure and pulse rate, and causes reduced hearing.
    At about 5% it causes stimulation of the respiratory centre, dizziness, confusion and difficulty in breathing accompanied by headache and shortness of breath.
    At about 8% it causes headache, sweating, dim vision, tremor and loss of consciousness after exposure for between five and ten minutes.

    So basically I'd stick to using the compressor, maybe buy a regulator for it so that you can drop the pressure down to 15 - 20 psi (most airbrushes like this range).
     
  4. LoyalNine

    LoyalNine New Member

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    Yeah thats the max pressure. Do I need some sort of moisture trap for it do you think??
     
  5. RAF Liberators

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    It depends how long you intend the hose from the compressor to your airbrush to be. If it's just a small hose a couple of meters etc then probably not. You might want to check if those tanks have drain valves on, normally moisture will sit in the bottom of the tanks.
    Try it without the trap and if you find you are getting beading then add a trap.
     
  6. muller

    muller Active Member

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    Sounds a bit like a normal saturday night out in Ireland!
     
  7. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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  8. jamierd

    jamierd Member

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    or a night out in scotland even
     
  9. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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  10. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Definitely the average night out with Jan !!
     
  11. RAF Liberators

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    Am I the only one here that's a wee bit concerned that someone is about to open up a big can of Carbon Dioxide in modelling den?
    Sorry but CO2 poisoning isn't funny, call me old fashioned :p
     
  12. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I think we'd all be concerned if LN used the CO2 bottle Gary, and you're quite right, Carbon Dioxide poisoning isn't nice - I had too much of a CO2 fire extinguisher in my face once! Fortunately though, your warning came before the frivolity which followed, so hopefully our friend will take heed.
    I'd also say that, although the compressor would do the job if able to be regulated down, I think it's perhaps a bit of an overkill, and probably a noisy one at that! But, if it's there, why not use it? Given the correct hose and fittings are available.
     
  13. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Agree to that! :oops::lol:
     
  14. RAF Liberators

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    If I had to get schmitt faced I'd rather just light up a big one, there's far nicer ways to get off your head :D
    I agree that compressor looks noisy but if it's a choice between that or the funny farm I'd buy ear defenders lol
     
  15. LoyalNine

    LoyalNine New Member

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    I was suprised to see the concern you guys had about the C02 though I suppose it is good sense. C02 is quite a common setup to power airbrushes. Does nobody here use that sort of setup?

    I would prefer actually to use a compressor so I can get rid of this bottle out of my garage. I was unsure if there were moisture , fittings or other issues I would need to deal with making it more trouble than its worth. I just don't have the cash to go out and but a small airbrush compressor now as I am only giving this whole modeling thing a try for the first time in many years.
     
  16. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Some studios use air bottles (similar to SCUBA bottles) as a standby, and of course there are the propellant cans used by many who don't have a compressor. The latter, however, are CFC free propellant which, AFAIK, aren't CO2. They also prove costly in the long run - the equivalent of 5 to 7 cans, enough to spray about the same number of small models, including air used for clean up, cost the same as a small compressor.
    The compressor you showed should be suitable, and I would think it will have a regulator. So, if you can set it somewhere in the 15 to 25 psi range, you should be ok. As far as moisture traps go, as Gary stated, with the 'average' hose length used in modelling, and the relatively short spraying times, it's unlikely that a trap will be needed. However, if it's found that you are experiencing 'splatter' or spotting due to moisture, then relatively inexpensive in-line traps are available, which fit onto the compressor hose outlet. The UK price of these range between about £12 and £18, and a simple but effective modelling compressor would set you back about £30 - roughly $50 I think. But if the one you've got will do the job, and isn't too noisy for comfortable use, why bother buying a small airbrush compressor?
     
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