DC-3/C-47

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by muscogeemike, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. muscogeemike

    muscogeemike Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    rural east Texas
    Just saw a TV segment on the Russians drilling into a lake under the Antarctic ice (good on them) and the aircraft they showed supporting the expedition was either a DC-3/C-47 or, more likely, the version they produced. Either way this design, over 70 years old, is still going strong!
     
  2. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    6,418
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    The C-47 is still going but not strong. You won't be going strong either when you're 70 years old. :)

    If someone is still using C-47s today it's because he cannot afford something newer such as the C-130 or C-160.
     
  3. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2005
    Messages:
    7,636
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    niagara falls
    OK what are you nattering about a 130 or 160 are completely different types of aircraft , sometimes old does not indicate bad , the C47 is simple ,easy to repair reliable etc etc etc . they have tried to replace it and the replacement 's for the most part are retired
     
  4. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    23,200
    Likes Received:
    786
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Maintenance Manager/ Flight Instructor
    Location:
    Colorado, USA
    100% NOT TRUE!!! I've worked on them and they are still a very viable and cost effective aircraft to operate IF you couldn't afford (or need) to buy a C-130. Most of the 70 year old airframes flying today have gone through some kind of refurbishment during their lifetime making them just as strong (if not stronger) than they were when they left the factory.
     
  5. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    You sure about that? Go up to Ted Stevens International Airport in Anchorage, Alaska and then tell me otherwise.

    Also did you know that the first aircraft to make a relief flight into Haiti after after the earthquake was a DC-3? The DC-3 is still used in good numbers and is still going very strong.
     
  6. davparlr

    davparlr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,934
    Likes Received:
    105
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    retired avionics engineer
    Location:
    Southern California
    Alaska is an amazing place for old civil aircraft. Those cubs with the big wheels are a hoot! Here's a picture of Talkeetna. The treeless area on the right is a landing strip!
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    47,663
    Likes Received:
    1,417
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    As the saying goes - "The only thing to replace a DC3/C47/Dakota is another DC 3...."
     
  8. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    19,419
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    Network Engineer/Photographer
    Location:
    Moorpark, CA
    Home Page:
    They still fly 2 DC-3s a day from Long Beach out to Catalina Island. They go places that turbines can't. When they need to go to the extreme colds, where jet fuel turns to jelly, what do they use? DC-3s and C-46s. You will see quite a few flying in Central and South America as well. They are certainly not tired and are very capable of doing everything they did 70+ years ago.

    The Israeli's have that saying "The only replacement for a Dakota is another Dakota" in the aircraft, in Hebrew aboard the aircraft that they finally retired in 2000! These were DC-3s that were built during WWII, flew in WWII, then to France and Belgium before the Israelis bought them. To maintain an active military career for over 50 years and still be flying is impressive, to say the least.

    DSC_3594.jpg
    "The only replacement for a Dakota, is another Dakota"
     
  9. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Messages:
    12,162
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    The back of beyond
    The Lisunov Li-2 up the road is still going strong too (that's the Russian version of the DC-3), with no plans to retire her for a good while yet. A number of C-47s are still active back in NZ too...
     
  10. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    #10 DerAdlerIstGelandet, Feb 10, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
    First back to the DC-3 discussion. There are literally hundreds of DC-3s still flying. I have seen numbers between 400 and 1000, but I am not sure the exact number. How is that not going strong? For an aircraft that is 70 years old, that is very impressive and shows how great that aircraft really is.

    Yes it absolutely is! How about Lake Hood right next to Ted Stevens Int. in Anchorage. Largest civil float plane airfield in the world.
     

    Attached Files:

    • lh.jpg
      lh.jpg
      File size:
      397.1 KB
      Views:
      70
    • lh2.jpg
      lh2.jpg
      File size:
      247.1 KB
      Views:
      68
    • lh3.jpg
      lh3.jpg
      File size:
      207.4 KB
      Views:
      71
    • lh4.jpg
      lh4.jpg
      File size:
      294.3 KB
      Views:
      70
    • lh5.jpg
      lh5.jpg
      File size:
      266.1 KB
      Views:
      67
  11. Geedee

    Geedee Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Messages:
    3,292
    Likes Received:
    210
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Wiltshire, UK
  12. davparlr

    davparlr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Messages:
    2,934
    Likes Received:
    105
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    retired avionics engineer
    Location:
    Southern California
    There's a hotel and restaurant on the south east corner of the lake. Pretty good place to eat and watch the planes come and go. There is also a air museum near the airfield. Several years ago it had a P-40 wing from a plane shot down in the Aleutians. Last time I checked they were working on it. I believe it had bullet holes in it from the fight.

    Last time I was at the airport a DC-6/7 landed and taxi in. It was impeccable! What a beauty.
     
  13. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    41,768
    Likes Received:
    684
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A&P - Aircraft Technician
    Location:
    USA/Germany
    Yeah I visited the museum. I went over to the restoration shop, but they were not working on a P-40. Parts of it were in the museum however.
     

    Attached Files:

    • m.jpg
      m.jpg
      File size:
      331.8 KB
      Views:
      56
    • m2.jpg
      m2.jpg
      File size:
      315.9 KB
      Views:
      54
    • m3.jpg
      m3.jpg
      File size:
      368.1 KB
      Views:
      54
    • m4.jpg
      m4.jpg
      File size:
      327.8 KB
      Views:
      54
  14. muscogeemike

    muscogeemike Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    rural east Texas
    As I said since the expedition drilling in the Antarctic is Russian the air craft is probably a Li-2. I was aware the Russians (and the Japanese) produced their versions of the plane - I was just too lazy to look up the nomenclature.
     
  15. nuuumannn

    nuuumannn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,743
    Likes Received:
    439
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Aircraft Engineer
    Location:
    Nelson
    #15 nuuumannn, Feb 10, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
    Gee, that's a mixed bag of stuff in that museum; looks like an interesting place to go.

    The Russians would have been using one of these:

    [​IMG]

    The exact number of Lisunov Li-2s, or PS-84s as they are also designated, is unknown; some have put it around 2,500, but no official figures have ever been released.

    Here's what a Kiwi one looks like.

    [​IMG]

    I love the engineering that went into the DC-3; typical solid American thinking. I worked on the Ham Std props off one of the flyers here once; removing the props is an exercise in brute force, as is removing the hub halves once they are on the bench.
     
  16. fastmongrel

    fastmongrel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Messages:
    2,339
    Likes Received:
    406
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Motor Mechanic
    Location:
    Lancashire
    An engineer friend once told me that the DC3/C47 Dakota airframe theoretically has no fatigue life. As long as proper care is taken and all damaged/worn airframe parts are cut out and properly replaced by someone who knows what they are doing it could fly forever. It would probably end up like Paddys axe though 3 new blades and 2 new handles :lol:

    I have had several flights in a Dak and absolutely loved every draughty, noisy, bone shaking minute even got to sit in the cockpit jump seat once. If its not the greatest 20 century aircraft then I want to know what is.
     
  17. oldcrowcv63

    oldcrowcv63 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,923
    Likes Received:
    96
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    Tired and Retired
    Location:
    Northeast North Carolina
    #17 oldcrowcv63, Feb 27, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
    Over the last few years, I worked with a bunch of scientists from the USA, British Antarctic Survey, Australia, Germany, China and Japan to map the subglacial Gamburtsev moutains under the two miles of ice comprising the east Anatarctic Ice Sheet. The mapping was done by a couple of radar equipped DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otters. Most of the project involved logistics preparation to allow the planes to stage from field sites deep in the interior flying a large network of tightly meshed grid flight paths to obtain a high resolution map of what lies beneath the ice: an entire mountain range the size and elevation of the alps that has remained completely buried for millions of years. If the russians are using DC-3s in the interior I suspect it probably eases the logistics burden of working so deep in the interior in some substantial way.

    If interested here is a link to a video describing the project:

    Antarctica's hidden world - Antarctica's Gamburtsev Province Project (AGAP) - British Antarctic Survey

    Thing about punching through the ice. It may expose organisms that have survived millions of years on a completely separate evolutionary path to modern biology. May not be a good idea who knows what organisms might be released? I see the zombie apocalypse in the world's future. :shock:
     
Loading...

Share This Page