Fw190D-13

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by bob44, Oct 17, 2012.

  1. bob44

    bob44 Member

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    So how many of these where produced? Do we know? I have read that 2 where made, and maybe 17 where made?
     
  2. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    My understanding is that 2 are known to have entered service, but 17 were possibly produced.

    One D-13 is still in existence today. It is located Flying Heritage Museum in Everette, Washington, and is in flying condition. It is Werk Nr. 836017, and was flown by the Geschwaderkommodore of JG 26, Franz Götz.
     

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  3. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    The evidence for Fw 190 D-13 production is slim.

    An OKL document of 7 April 1945,reporting on the previous month,would indicate that only two D-13s were in service.

    The evidence for the seventeen completed is based on the Werknummer of "Yellow 10",mentioned above,ending in 17. The D-13 production had been given a new Werknummer block,starting 83.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  4. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Information from sources I've found so far on the D-13 concur with what Chris and Steve have posted. I'm unaware of any new details confirming use or completion of further examples.
     
  5. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    There were plans to construct the D-13 at the Weser Flugzeug plant at Nordenham. Previously this plant,part of "Arbeitsgruppe Roland",had only constructed Fw 190 fuselages. This didn't happen before the end of the war.
    A US report of July 1945 noted an undamaged assembly line with 30 Fw 190 D-13 fuselages at Nordenham. The Americans also found a "group" of completely finished fuselages (the report doesn't say how many) awaiting transportation,presumably to the Lemmwerder plant where wings and other parts were delivered for assembly with the fuselages.

    As "A4K" says the best numbers we have are 2 in service and 17 completed though there may have been more. It would not have been easy for a non-technical member of the occupying Forces to identify the various sub-types.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  6. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    As Steve notes 2 in service with JG26, I don't think the second one that was discovered a few years ago, D-13 836016 with double Chevrons found at Pilsen was the second JG26 machine so there were definite a small series built and issued.
     
  7. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

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    An interesting aside to this discussion is the fact that the existing D-13 when it was originally taken into possession by its current owner had the wings of the D-9 that is currently in the NMUSAF, obviously with the reverse being true as well. However when they started restoring the D-13 the error was discovered and the wings were amicably swapped. Another little tidbit I learned which speaks to the quality control of German manufacturing towards the end of the war was that while disassembling the D-13 wing a bunch of shims came out falling on the floor!
     
  8. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    The initial restoration carried out under the ownership of Champlin,who bought the aircraft in 1972,was done in Germany with the "wrong" wings. These wings had become assocciated with "Yellow 10" years earlier when it was shipped from Freeman Field with the wrong wings.
    It was only when a second restoration,again under the ownership of Doug Champlin,was started in 2000 that the wings were swopped back.
    Paul Allen (Flying Heritage Collection) purchased the restored aircraft in 2007 and as far as I know still owns it.

    836016 was marked with a double chevron (Gruppenkommandeur) and may have served with an unknown unit rather than JG 26 despite the fact that the only known and documented service of D-13s was the two with Stab JG 26. Crandall suggests I./EKG(J) on the grounds that it was based at Pilsen where the aircraft was found. It doesn't carry that unit's typical markings either.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  9. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

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    My mistake. I thought Champlin still owned it. He was the "current owner" I was erroneously referring to. Thanks for the correction. It appears my information was a bit out of date! :oops:
     
  10. meatloaf109

    meatloaf109 Well-Known Member

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    Wow! The depth of info around here never ceases to amaze me.
     
  11. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    Mine might be too! I know Allen bought it in 2007,but since then......... :)

    Steve
     
  12. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    #12 drgondog, Oct 18, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2012
    Paul Allen basically bought Champlin Museum including the WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam era fighters that used to be in Mesa. I don't know whether Doug Champlin sold his machine gun exhibit to go along with it.

    I had built, and donated in 1984, a Top Flite 1/7 scale P-51B (Greatly Modified to bring very close to scale) of my father's first Mustang and have never been able to find out what happened to it. I spent at least 500 hours on it and completely detailed the wheel wells, Gear doors, cockpit and vacu formed a Malcolm Hood. I forgot to take pictures of the damn thing but in the process of building another - very slowly.
     
  13. cimmex

    cimmex Member

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    What is the difference between a D-9 and D-13 wing?
    Cimmex
     
  14. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    Externally most noticeable would be the large single slot under the centre section for ejection of the 20mm cartrdge cases and links. The slots for the inboard wing cannon had rounded ends,can't remember if the D-9's did or not.
    On the fuselage of a D-13 the starboard,forward,fuel filler position is lower than on any other type of Fw 190. The engine primer filler hole (port side) is likewise higher. That's one in the eye for those who still believe these aircraft were constructed using A series fuselages :)

    Crandall wrote of the mix up:

    "The wings belonging to Fw 190 D-9 W.Nr. 601088 were accidentally shipped with the fuselage of D-13 "Yellow 10" as they were supposedly interchangeable. At first glance the wings appear to be the same,but of course it is now known that such is not the case.The two components,fuselage and wings,would fit for static display,but would require major alterations to be made flight-worthy."

    Unfortunately he does not say what the "major alterations" might have entailed.

    During the first "Champlin" restoration of "Yellow 10" there is mention of a hydraulic aileron boost system in the fuselage being blanked off as it didn't link with the D-9 wings.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  15. spicmart

    spicmart Member

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    Wasn't it so that the later Doras all had the Ta 152 paddle prop with even wider blades as the ones attached on the D-9s?
    It appears not to be the case with this D-13.
    Maybe someone here knows more about it?
     
  16. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    The D-13 had a VS-9 propeller with 9-27012 C-1 type blades. These were indeed wooden "paddle" blades.

    The original propeller was one of the many parts lost prior to the first restoration and a replica were made,in Germany,by Hoffmann Propeller. As far as I know that is the propeller still fitted.

    Steve
     
  17. cimmex

    cimmex Member

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    Thank you Steve, I’ve heard about boosted ailerons at German late war planes but never found out how they worked or any other Info. Do you have more details?
    Cimmex
     
  18. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    The system on the D-13 was the same (or very similar) to the Ta 152. I believe I have a plan of the hydraulic system of the Ta 152 somewhere which I will endeavour to find.
    Steve
     
  19. bob44

    bob44 Member

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    Thanks for the information all.
     
  20. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    No luck with that. I'm interested to find out myself now!
    The system is always referred to as "power boosted ailerons" and given the mix up between wings that did and did not have this feature I assume that this does not mean servo tabs which should be externally obvious.
    Steve
     
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