GB 22-Seaplanes, Floatplanes of WWII, Allied or Axis.

Discussion in '#22 Seaplanes / Floatplanes of WWII' started by fubar57, Apr 17, 2014.

  1. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    11,089
    Likes Received:
    1,046
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Heavy Equipment Operator
    Location:
    Jungles of Canada
    Right....2 weeks away until the next GB starts(I know, 6 weeks until the current one is over but I'm ansty.), so who has a subject in mind. My subject will be a Consolidated Canso, 162(BR)SQN s/n 9754/P flown by RCAF pilot Flt.Lt David Hornell V.C.(Posthumously) against U-1225. So far I can't find a photo of the aircraft...:director:JAN some assistance if you can?

    Geo
     
  2. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2008
    Messages:
    25,143
    Likes Received:
    960
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Calgary
    Yeah, no. I'll probably sit this one out. Nothing in the stash will fit and unless my summer plans diminish and something jumps into my arms at the next model show, I'll be an observer rather than a participant.
     
  3. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    51,156
    Likes Received:
    847
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Adelaide Sth. Aust.
    well....I think I will breakout my 1/72 Bv222 which I started many moons ago and never went back to it, also have a 1/144 Kawanishi Emily also started and should finish...
     
  4. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009
    Messages:
    24,064
    Likes Received:
    655
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Korporate Kontrolleur
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Great choices so far.
     
  5. Rogi

    Rogi Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2011
    Messages:
    2,161
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I think I have a 1/72 old school :D He-115 Matchbox! :) kit, oh great little kits :D

    Will finally get a chance to do a Swedish He-115.

    I just hope regular glue will do ok for this one :D and I don't have to pull out any solvents to melt it.
     
  6. Alex .

    Alex . Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2013
    Messages:
    272
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Occupation:
    University Student
    Location:
    West Midlands, UK / Gwynedd, Land of Dragons
    Think I may give this one a shot...No idea what yet though :p
     
  7. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    36,727
    Likes Received:
    1,064
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Nightshift picker
    Location:
    A Swede living in Glasgow, Scotland
    Home Page:
    This gentleman?

    [​IMG]

    David Ernest Hornell

    David Ernest Hornell was born in Toronto, Ontario on 26 January 1910. In 1941 he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF), qualified as a pilot and was commissioned in 1942. At the time of the action for which he received the Victoria Cross posthumously, Flight Lieutenant Hornell was flying as aircraft captain on Consolidated Canso amphibians with No. 162 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron, RCAF from Royal Air Force (RAF) Station Wick in Northern Scotland.

    Late in the day on 24 June 1944, Hornell’s Canso was at the end of a 12-hour patrol over the North Atlantic when the German submarine U-1225 was sighted on the surface approximately 120 miles north of the Shetland Islands. As the aircraft made its attack run, heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire from the U-boat crippled the starboard engine and started a fire on the starboard wing. With great determination and skill, Hornell held the vibrating Canso on course and delivered his four depth charges on target, sinking the submarine. Shortly thereafter the starboard engine fell out of the wing, forcing Flight Lieutenant Hornell to ditch the aircraft, by now a flaming wreck, in the heavy seas. With only one dinghy serviceable, for several hours the eight members of the crew had to take turns holding on to the life-raft’s side while immersed in the icy water. Although the dinghy was spotted by a Consolidated Catalina flying boat from No. 333 (Norwegian) Squadron, RAF five hours after Hornell had ditched, for the next 16 hours rescue attempts were frustrated by high seas and malfunctioning equipment. Two of the crew eventually died of exposure. At one point, Flight Lieutenant Hornell had to be restrained by his comrades when, though at the end of his own strength and about to go blind, he proposed to swim to an airborne lifeboat that had been dropped. Finally, after 21 hours, a rescue launch arrived to pick up the survivors, but all attempts to revive Hornell failed, and he died of exposure.

    Flight Lieutenant Hornell was the first member of the RCAF to be awarded the Victoria Cross.

    Citation

    "Flight Lieutenant Hornell was captain and first pilot of a twin-engined amphibian aircraft engaged on an anti-submarine patrol in northern waters. The patrol had lasted for some hours when a fully-surfaced U-boat was sighted, travelling at high speed on the port beam. Flight Lieutenant Hornell at once turned to the attack.

    The U-boat altered course. The aircraft had been seen and there could be no surprise. The U-boat opened up with anti-aircraft fire which became increasingly fierce and accurate.

    At a range of 1,200 yards, the front guns of the aircraft replied; then its starboard guns jammed, leaving only one gun effective. Hits were obtained on and around the conning-tower of the U-boat, but the aircraft was itself hit, two large holes appearing in the starboard wing.

    Ignoring the enemy’s fire, Flight Lieutenant Hornell carefully manoeuvred for the attack. Oil was pouring from his starboard engine, which was, by this time, on fire, as was the starboard wing; and the petrol tanks were endangered. Meanwhile, the aircraft was hit again and again by the U-boat’s guns. Holed in many places, it was vibrating violently and very difficult to control.

    Nevertheless, the captain decided to press home his attack, knowing that with every moment the chances of escape for him and his gallant crew would grow more slender. He brought his aircraft down very low and released his depth charges in a perfect straddle. The bows of the U-boat were lifted out of the water; it sank and the crew were seen in the sea.

    Flight Lieutenant Hornell contrived, by superhuman efforts at the controls, to gain a little height. The fire in the starboard wing had grown more intense and the vibration had increased. Then the burning engine fell off. The plight of aircraft and crew was now desperate. With the utmost coolness, the captain took his aircraft into wind and, despite the manifold dangers, brought it safely down on the heavy swell. Badly damaged and blazing furiously, the aircraft rapidly settled.

    After ordeal by fire came ordeal by water. There was only one serviceable dinghy and this could not hold all the crew. So they took turns in the water, holding on to the sides. Once, the dinghy capsized in the rough seas and was righted only with great difficulty. Two of the crew succumbed from exposure.

    An airborne lifeboat was dropped to them but fell some 500 yards down wind. The men struggled vainly to reach it and Flight Lieutenant Hornell, who throughout had encouraged them by his cheerfulness and inspiring leadership, proposed to swim to it, through he was nearly exhausted. He was with difficulty restrained. The survivors were finally rescued after they had been in the water for 21 hours. By this time Flight Lieutenant Hornell was blinded and completely exhausted. He died shortly after being picked up.

    Flight Lieutenant Hornell had completed 60 operational missions, involving 600 hours’ flying. He well knew the danger and difficulties attending attacks on submarines. By pressing home a skilful and successful attack against fierce opposition, with his aircraft in a precarious condition, and by fortifying and encouraging his comrades in the subsequent ordeal, this officer displayed valour and devotion to duty of the highest order.”

    (London Gazette, no.36630, 28 July 1944)
     
  8. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    36,727
    Likes Received:
    1,064
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Nightshift picker
    Location:
    A Swede living in Glasgow, Scotland
    Home Page:
    [​IMG]

    A step-by-step artistic recreation
    of the ordeal of Flight Lieutenant David Ernest Hornell
    and his crew on 24-25 June 1944​
     
  9. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    11,089
    Likes Received:
    1,046
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Heavy Equipment Operator
    Location:
    Jungles of Canada
    That's the guy. I have managed to locate a photo which I'll post in my entry. Thanks Jan and I'll more than likely be bugging you later for some info.

    Geo
     
  10. Wildcat

    Wildcat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    8,857
    Likes Received:
    376
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Workin' for the man....
    Location:
    South East Queensland
    Hi Geo, there was a PB2B that carried the name "David Hornell VC" along its cockpit, not the aircraft your after, but interesting nonetheless. It served with the RAAF as A24-360.
    picture credit Welcome to ADF Serials
     

    Attached Files:

  11. destrozas

    destrozas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    2,344
    Likes Received:
    55
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    electromechanical assembly
    in my case, I have very many doubts that planes I can do since I have like 12 seaplanes and everyone has their thing, so if you have clear is that I'm going to battle with the BV138, super detail, I have pictures of one of these grabemente that after being damaged in the Gulf of vizcaya splashed down off the coast of sestao, the Basque country in Spain, but of course I want to leave this to the working group of the Battle of the Atlantic (GB27), but good and I'll decide, I also have a small BV222 engines to make the version V4 hardly Was operational, which is neither transparent nor inside that gave it to me use all this to make the biggest BV238, I was looking online and I found one that I would come home in time for 50 € delivery charges, taxes and other all-inclusive, it is very expensive but good not find it here or joke and I found myself asking € 100 if!!

    Although I have also Japanese seaplane I did already one forum.
    so if I have more than clear is that I do Heinkel HE115 that was in cartagena b3 after the fall of the navy base in the Spanish Civil War
     
  12. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,872
    Likes Received:
    637
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    Wayne banging out the monster Bv 222? Say it ain't so! I HAVE to see that!
     
  13. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    51,156
    Likes Received:
    847
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Adelaide Sth. Aust.
    Soon....my friend.....VERY soon...:D
     
  14. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,872
    Likes Received:
    637
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
  15. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    51,156
    Likes Received:
    847
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Adelaide Sth. Aust.
  16. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    8,633
    Likes Received:
    224
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    reduced to all around slobbing
    Location:
    Miranda, NSW
    Was gonna do a 1962 VP-48 Martin P5M like one I almost got run down by in the middle of the night in San Diego Bay while turning on the sea plane landing lane lights! But just too much in it and want to get some of the HARS aircraft farther along.

    So will do a little something like an He-51b, like this............. but am looking for a little more colorful scheme.
    Anyone got something to go by????? with more color, or colour?

    I may not get my Wildcat done because of the dagone move!
     

    Attached Files:

    • Like Like x 1
  17. parsifal

    parsifal Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    10,676
    Likes Received:
    676
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Urban Design/Strategic Studies Tutor
    Location:
    Orange NSW
    I have two that I can enter...a tamiya 1/72 Aichi M6A1 Seiran, and a 1/72 PBY5A of 43 black cat squadron RAAF. this Kit is thye Academy version, and it looks terrific.

    I might try to do an ocean diaram out of modelling clay, or, make the model watertight so that it can sit in an actual water display for its photos. That will be difficult....will need to seal the joints and the decals, and make sure the CG and bouyancy is approximately right
     
  18. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    11,089
    Likes Received:
    1,046
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Heavy Equipment Operator
    Location:
    Jungles of Canada
    It appears the float plane He-51 versions are pretty drab while their land locked brothers have lots of color. Will keep looking.

    Geo
     
  19. dneid

    dneid Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2012
    Messages:
    1,108
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Program/Project Mgr
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I have an AR-196 but, I am not sure about this GB. I am just not a huge seaplane guy. Plus the eduard Spit has me really immersed in that fun.
     
  20. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2005
    Messages:
    47,617
    Likes Received:
    1,461
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    A retired military Navigator/ATC, FIS controller
    Location:
    Poland
    With the white number 12 she looks good too....

    he51b2_.jpg
     
Loading...

Share This Page